Are You Lost In “No Man’s Land”?

Every entrepreneur dreams of having a fast growth company and seldom does it come easy.  If you are a fast or medium growth company, you have probably experienced periods where you seem “stuck” – you may be there right now!  You have built a successful company, but it seems like you are bouncing off a ceiling.  You may have grown to such a point that you are in what Doug Tatum calls, “No Man’s Land – too big to be small, but too small to be big.sm [1]   I call this “The Ceiling of Complexity”.

As an organization grows, it by nature becomes more complex and if we don’t learn how to simplify, we get stuck. And sometimes, it gets worse.  As Cliff Oxford points out, fast growth create complexity, resulting in chaos, often resulting in losing high-performance employees.  [2]

Complexity Oxford Boarder compressed

What are the causes?

People problems – 82% of the people we work with say they are not getting all they want from their people or losing high-performance employees.

  1. Poor execution – the classic article “Why CEOs Fail,” that first appeared in FORTUNE magazine in 1999 is still relevant today.  The authors reported 70% fail due to poor execution.  [3]
  2. Plateau – revenue and/or profit needles aren’t moving up at the pace you want.
  3. Conflict – with team leadership, partners or family members in the business.
  4. Right People in the Right Seats – Questions: “Would you enthusiastically rehire all of your leadership team today?”  (Think about it!)
  5. Balanced Life – you are missing important family events and can’t remember your last 2-week vacation.
  6. Tired – maybe you are just TIRED of abstract theories, complex programs and consultants that don’t help you get consistent results.

After many years of helping businesses overcome these issues and breakthrough this “Ceiling of Complexity”, we have found that the problem is usually NOT:

  • Lack of industry Knowledge
  • Lack of business knowledge
  • Lack of not working hard enough.

The truth is — you don’t need another consultant to tell you what to do  —  but rather you need a sound business process to ”wrap around” your industry and business knowledge – that  creates a well-oiled machine that gets big results without you always being present.  A process that manages complexity and is always driving toward simplifying the business process.

We have found after evaluating and using many business systems and coaching programs, that there is one that really does just that.  It’s called the Entrepreneurial Operating System or EOS® developed by Gino Wickman and described in his book, Traction®.

EOS® is a comprehensive yet simple to understand system with simple tools that your leadership team learns how to use – and as a result achieves three things:

  • Vision –  your leaders  become 100% on the same page with where your organization is going and how it is going to get there.
  • Traction® – your leaders become more disciplined and accountable, and executing really well to achieve every part of your vision.
  • Healthy –  your leaders become a healthy, functional, cohesive leadership team (unfortunately, we find leaders often don’t function well as a team).

AND… as goes your leadership team, so goes the rest of your organization.

Bottom line: Can you can imagine what it would be like to have your whole team rowing in the same direction — disciplined and accountable to each other when it comes to execution – would that move your organization in the direction you would want to go?

So, if any of this resonates with you, I encourage you to get a copy of Traction®. If you want more information, I would love to show you and your leadership team HOW we do this with all of our clients.  There is no fee involved.  Simply click here to make an appointment for a brief phone conversation.

  1. Doug Tatum, No Man’s Land – too big to be small, but too small to be big 
  2. Cliff Oxford, The Oxford Center for Entrepreneurs, “How to Eliminate Chaos in a Growth Environment,” Video www.oxford-center.com
  3. Ram Charan and Geoffrey Colvin, “Why CEOs Fail,” Fortune